Start Composting
Whatever the test results, you'll also want to spread a half-inch of compost on the lawn to add essential organic matter to the soil. Paul Tukey, author of The Organic Lawn Care Manual, and founder of Safelawns.org, sees compost treatments as the basis for all organic lawn care. "It's almost like a blood transfusion," he says. "It improves soil structure—especially in clay or sand-heavy soil—and is full of beneficial organisms, including bacteria, algae, fungi, and nematodes, that keep your soil healthy."

Look for compost that is made up of decomposed organic plant material, similar to the stuff you find on the forest floor. You can buy it at nurseries, or collect your own yard waste in a backyard bin. Many municipalities have composting programs, which provide information on how to compost and, sometimes, discounted composting bins. Tukey also recommends speeding up your lawn's transition to organic by brewing your own compost tea and spraying it on your lawn once a month with a backpack sprayer or a watering can.
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